How Much Do Garden Gazebos Cost? | GroveGypsy

Wondering how much do garden gazebos cost? Pre-constructed, they cost between $150 to $15,000. To build a gazebo from scratch will run you $7,500 to $10,000.

The costs of building a gazebo are based on multiple factors, such as shape, size, design complexity and materials used. When buying a pre-built gazebo, the brand name is also a factor. For DIY projects, expect to spend about $1,500 to $3,000 for purchasing materials at big box hardware stores.

This article covers how much it costs to purchase a garden gazebo kit, what comes with it and other cost factors, such as add-on amenities and professional installation. We also cover the costs of building a DIY gazebo based on size and various types of materials.

I’ve been “window shopping” for gazebos for quite some time now. As a renter, it’s important to find something long-lasting that we can pack up and take with us when and if we ever move. So, I’m sharing 10 commonly used materials I’ve discovered to help you decide what works best for you, your needs and your budget.

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What Is a Garden Gazebo?

A gazebo is a structure that is covered to give your garden some shade. Traditionally, they are shaped like octagons. More modern shapes include round and square structures with legs and canvas roofs.

They feature benches, often built-in, so you can sit back and enjoy the shade they provide. Savvy gardeners also add planter boxes along the outside of their gazebos. These structures are traditionally constructed using wood. But they can also be made of other materials, which we cover below.

How Much Does It Cost to Buy a Garden Gazebo Kit?

A gazebo kit purchased on the market typically costs $150 to $15,000. Here is an in-depth breakdown:

  • Canvas Roof Gazebo Kit – A simple design kit sold at big box home improvement stores and discount department stores runs about $150 to $600
  • Wood-Like & Wood Gazebo Kit – Also sold at big box hardware stores and discount department stores, these run $2,000 to $10,000
  • Gazebo Kit Plans – Get customized plans created from carpentry design vendors for about $15 to $40

What Comes with a Garden Gazebo Kit?

Some gazebo kits come with pre-constructed parts, such as partially constructed roof and wall sections. Be sure to check the packaging to know for sure how much DIY building you’ll be required to do.

  • Canvas Roof Gazebo – This kit should come with all the hardware needed for assembly, the legs and the canvas roof itself
  • Wood-Like & Wood – These kits should include all the hardware and lumber necessary for construction, as well as complete instructions and plans for building the gazebo
  • Homemade Gazebo Plans – Should come with lists of all the hardware and lumber required, along with schematic drawings and directions for putting the gazebo together

Other Cost Factors for DIY Gazebo Kits

Some DIY gazebo building kits come with everything you need, as well as popular amenities. However, some don’t. Below is a list of some of those gazebo amenities and their costs:

  • Gazebo Floor – $1,200 to $2,200
  • Gazebo Roof (Shingled) - $600 to $800
  • Gazebo Screen - $700 to $800
  • Professional Gazebo Installation (Non-DIY) - $500

DIY Gazebo Costs Based on Sizes

It can cost anywhere from $4,000 to $10,000 to build a gazebo. A traditional screen gazebo made with cedar with one roof averages about $8,750 when constructed from scratch using a kit.

One of the biggest factors that determine how much do garden gazebos cost is their size. Average construction costs are estimated at $75 to $100 per square foot.

The smaller the gazebo the lower the costs of construction. That’s because smaller structures mean:

  • Fewer materials to buy
  • Faster to construct
  • Lower labor costs
  • Less chance of needing a building permit

Here are the typical costs of gazebo installation based on the size:

  • 64 sq. ft. - $4,500 to $6,500
  • 81 sq. ft. - $6,000 to $8,000
  • 100 sq. ft. - $7,500 to $10,000
  • 144 sq. ft. - $11,000 to $15,000
  • 196 sq. ft. - $14,000 to $20,000

10 Types of Gazebo Materials and Their Costs

For both residential and commercial gazebos, you can choose from various styles and shapes. Here are some of the most common gazebos shapes on the market:

  • Octagon
  • Oval
  • Rectangle
  • Square

The most common material used for building DIY gazebos is wood. Here are ten more traditionally used when constructing these garden hardscapes:

1. Aluminum Gazebos

Aluminum is one of the most commonly used metals on the planet. It’s a silver-colored element that’s very lightweight. These gazebos don’t offer a large number of style options. However, this material is extremely weather-resistant and lasts for years to come.

The cost of installing an aluminum gazebo is about $4,500.

2. Bamboo Gazebos

Bamboo is an organic wood commonly used in the construction of furniture and buildings, such as gazebos. It’s a popular substitute for mahogany and cedar. It’s a very durable and aesthetically-pleasing sustainable resource.

However, bamboo gazebos are not very durable. Long-term exposure to moisture can cause the structure to change over time or even develop cracks. These gazebos run about $4,600 to build.

3. Brick Gazebos

Even though they require bricklaying skills, it is very cost-efficient to install a brick gazebo. Because bricks are such durable material, these gazebos are long-lasting and almost maintenance-free.

The costs of purchasing the materials and having a brick gazebo installed on-site by a professional will run you about $3,200.

4. Cast Iron Gazebos

Looking for something a bit more traditional? Cast iron gazebos, also called iron cast gazebos, are not generally offered in modern designs. However, this hardscape gives your landscape a timeless, elegant feel. They are extremely durable and require very little maintenance after installation.

These gazebos will cost you about $5,300 to construct and install.

5. Cedar Wood Gazebos

For a long-lasting gazebo material that’s both disease-resistant and pest-resistant, cedar is a good choice. It’s a fragrant wood that requires staining and other maintenance. For a more modern look, choose something like western red cedar.

The average cost of installing a redwood cedar gazebo is about $6,000.

6. Pine Gazebos

Pine is one of the most inexpensive gazebo materials on the market. It comes with numerous design options. Pine gazebos are not as sustainable as other materials and require some maintenance for upkeep. Treat it with eco-friendly products to protect it from fungal decay and termite damage. Then, stain or paint it immediately.

A pine gazebo doesn’t last very long. So, it will only cost you about $4,800.

7. Reinforced Concrete Gazebos

Homeowners seeking something permanent can go with reinforced concrete for one of the most durable hardscape structures on the market. It’s long-lasting, even after going through extreme weather conditions.

Because of its extreme durability, a reinforced concrete gazebo is very expensive. Expect to pay about $10,000 to construct one from scratch.

8. Steel Gazebos

Steel is another highly durable material. A steel gazebo can handle just about any type of weather condition. After installation, very small amounts of maintenance are needed.

These gazebos will run you about $7,000 to build and install.

9. Vinyl Gazebos

Vinyl is quickly becoming a hot trend for hardscapes, such as retaining walls, fencing and gazebos. The material lasts a long time and doesn’t require much maintenance. Design options are limited, yet they are a bit costly.

Expect to pay somewhere around $3,000 for a vinyl gazebo.

10. Wrought Iron Gazebo

Looking for an inexpensive, long-lasting material for your custom-built gazebo? Wrought iron is a trendy choice among homeowners who want something that will last. This material does not offer a wide variety of designs and styles. And it doesn’t fare as well as other materials when it comes to extreme weather.

Wrought iron gazebos are one of the most inexpensive on this list, coming in at about $3,000.

About THE AUTHOR

Kiesha Joseph

Kiesha Joseph

Kiesha Joseph is an avid gardener dedicated to simple urban gardening on a budget. She enjoys sharing her Zone 9B Inland Empire, California experiences, as well as inexpensive DIY landscaping techniques. She loves experimenting in the garden, even if the project seems to be a failure. According to her, she does not learn from her successes. She learns from her failures. And that’s why she is determined to keep experimenting.

Read more about Kiesha Joseph